Convolvulus tricolor

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The Convolvulus tricolor is actually a plant species that originates from the Mediterranean region. Maybe that’s why I couldn’t find any bees in these flowers, as with the Californian gold poppy. In France, the Convolvulus tricolor is called »Belle-de-jour« — the beauty of the day — because it braids its pretty flowers at night and in bad weather. It does not like cold and wet weather, otherwise it is quite undemanding. We have always been able to notice this here in our bee pasture.

California Gold Poppy

California Gold Poppy

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What a beautiful blossom!

I like the golden yellow of the Californian golden poppy much better than the cold yellow of the yellow poppy. For more than two weeks I hoped to catch a bee here in bloom, but unfortunately I was not able to do so. But it was nice to see the macro photos, how the lush pollen lay on the petals.

On one of the last days, a hoverfly sat decoratively in the flower and slurped the nectar — do you see it? read more and write a comment …

Vaccaria hispanica

Vaccaria hispanica

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The tender pink flowering Vaccaria hispanica always give a pretty picture in our bee pasture. Next to the cornflowers, the first blossoms were also the first to emerge. I was curious from the beginning whether bees or bumblebees would enter this small and deep flower opening. It was a sweet sight to see the small field bumblebee squeezing itself into the calyx. The following 4 pictures show this quite well: read more and write a comment …

Cornflower with bee

Cornflower with bee

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Many cornflowers bloom in our bee pasture. In blue, pink, white and now even in red! What I especially like about this photo is that you can see the pollen panties on the hind leg of the honey bee. With the naked eye you can see the pollen panties when the bees are buzzing from flower to flower, but in the macro shot you can also see that it is a mixture of pollen and flower nectar. I think it looks really sticky.

Echium vulgare — viper’s bugloss

Echium vulgare — viper’s bugloss

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The flowering period of these plants, which are particularly popular with bees, is from May to October. Their special feature is the widely protruding stamens, which are sometimes used by bees as a land help. In our garden, the Blue Viper’s Head is one of the many flowers in the bee pasture, which we have planted on approx. 12 sqm at the end of the property.

Since we planted them quite late this year, the plants did not start to bloom until July. But since then there is a lot of activity in the bee pasture during the day. Many species of wild bees, ground bumblebees and also honey bees can be found here. I have brought some pictures with wild bees in the Blue Viper’s Head here, if you look closely you can see on picture 0028 how the bee lies on the stamens: read more and write a comment …

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